Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Disclosure Fever Spreads While Facts Remain Scarce

Sen. Harry Reid
Former Sen. Harry Reid continued to attract attention from the UFO community, this time suggesting AATIP files should not remain secret, according to a March 7 article by George Knapp. This is seemingly a complete backpedal from Reid's 2018 statements to New York Magazine when he chastised reporters, declaring there are "hundreds and hundreds of papers" on the project, "80 percent, at least is public," and "the press has never even looked at it." 

Earlier this month, Knapp reported:
The longtime Nevada lawmaker admits he sponsored a secret study that was coordinated by a Las Vegas contractor. But very little of what was produced by the study has been made public. So, what's hiding in those files and when do we get to see them?
For more than a year, the public has heard about the secret study initiated by Senator Harry Reid and other lawmakers. The study continued for years, but whatever files or reports it created, very little of the material has been made public.
It could be argued the former politician could be more specific as to exactly what material he is referencing from one interview to the next, and doing so might help clear up discrepancies. However, that will not stop others from pointing out fans of Reid and TTSA are enabling ambiguous sensationalism by acting as apologists for the perpetual lack of detail. Well over a year now since claims were set forth in the initial NYT article, many rather extraordinary assertions remain unconfirmed and, perhaps worse yet, largely unaddressed by those responsible.

Tom DeLonge
In related developments, A+E Networks announced its History Channel will air Unidentified: Inside America's UFO Investigation. The show is described as a six-part non-fiction series produced by Tom DeLonge. The six one-hour episodes feature Luis Elizondo and a collection of personalities easily recognizable to those following the TTSA plot lines. Let's hope the show ties up some of those loose "metal alloy" ends, among many other looming questions, and either justifies previous assertions or walks them back.

Last but not least, UFO-film producer Robert Kiviat reportedly filed a lawsuit against CIA man Ron Pandolfi and others. Kiviat apparently seeks to bring disclosure to a UFO and extraterrestrial truth embargo. 

Those with longer standing interests in UFO culture will recall Pandolfi for numerous reasons, including reportedly running the CIA "weird desk," being a central figure in the cultivation of the "core story," and seeding the online community with questionable tales. According to Bruce Maccabee, Pandolfi also suggested in 1990 that official CIA interest in UFOs involved counterintelligence purposes. Maccabee wrote that Pandolfi claimed the Agency obtained firm evidence the KGB devised a plan to use U.S. citizens, including ufologists, to penetrate the defense program (The FBI-CIA-UFO Connection: The Hidden UFO Activities of USA Intelligence Agencies, p354).

UFO activists sought assistance from the courts in the past with mixed results. It tends to be much more practical to obtain specific documents and files, for instance, than pursuing actions of intelligence personnel. We'll stay tuned while the judge sorts it out.

A central theme of many of the disclosure narratives seems to be the players' lack of understanding, sincerely or otherwise, that UFO reports themselves are not disputed. It remains yet to be seen how much more than hearsay and speculation can be applied to the reports to confirm context and alleged extraordinary origins. The track record of UFO disclosure is not flattering, to be quite forgiving in its description.  

8 comments:

  1. Once you catch disclosure fever it can spread. And no matter what is disclosed, there will still be those who will dismiss it as false flags or disinformation - conferences must go on.

    Alloys are so 2012, or whatever year it was that I was shown an alloy from the Roswell crash at our local MUFON meeting. I won't be satisfied until they release the photos of Obama meeting the aliens on Mars. Or was it Vesta?

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  2. Their still doesnt appear to be any definitive answers to disclose aside from some basic points (like technology observed is not a product of any nation, given the apparent physics involved....the aatip report assessments on nimitz case note that much) Discovery in the Kiviat case might reveal some things, and Reid's pointing to SAPs with further info and knowledge could mean some answers have been obtained.
    The missionary energy right now for disclosure seems based on people wanting to feel less of an outcast among friends, family and associates.

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  3. This is getting hilarious.

    While in office, some politicians become addicted to "seeing their name in lights" and I bet Reid is one of those. In his post-politics life, it's not easy for him to give up having people hanging onto his every word, even if those words now don't make a lick of sense. Some former office holders turn this need into a post-political life of public service on a national and international scale (Jimmy Carter). While others attach themselves to questionable or outright silly activities like Reid has done here. And who can forget Tom Delay on "Dancing With The Stars”?

    As for any DeLonge-produced UFO show, the blindly faithful will credulously watch, while the more pragmatic and skeptical will ignore it (it’s free cable, after all). It won't be any better or worse than the countless other UFO “mockumentaries” aired on History, Travel, Discovery, Nat Geo, et al. And, it’d have to go a long way to be more execrable than “Ancient Aliens”.

    Food for thought. When you're embedded in a sub-sub-culture, such as Ufology, it's hard to see that your views (as they exist in your head) aren't shared by most of the rest of the world.


    If you stop and ask some random people on the street if they believe in UFOs they might answer "yes" (maybe just to get rid of you), then walk away and totally forget about them until someone again shoves UFOs directly in their faces. Ditto for UFO disclosure. Stop someone and ask if they support UFO disclosure and there's probably a 50-50 chance they'll answer “yes”. But after they walk away from you, poof, it's gone from their brains because it's not at all important to them.

    All of this frenzy involves a relatively small and tightly-knit community that creates and then feeds on its own memes. Given everything going on in the US and world today, as well as the seemingly endless series of major economic dislocations looming ahead for each of us due to the unchecked proliferation of technology, UFOs provide a no-brainer distraction from the major issues no one, especially our leaders, wants to address head on. They're akin to bread and circuses.

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  4. Pandolfis name has been tossed around as a member of the infamous Avairy. So,accounts of him "seeding stories" might just be in reference to a role in the Bennewitz operation and the KGB comment a lame attempt to justify what they did to that poor man.

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    1. Pandolfi goes way back with Dan Smith, the old Open Minds Forum, Gary Bekkum at STARstream Research, etc., etc., etc.

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    2. Thanks Jack for the info. Following up on it, I thought the following from Gary Bekkum was interesting:
      http://www.starpod.us/2010/12/22/cia-unauthorized-spy-games-the-pandolfi-green-doty-affair-leaked-email-stream-source-dr-ronald-s-pandolfi-cia/#.XIx8MihKiUl

      It's interesting how the individual targeted in Pandolfi's correspondence is none other than Richard Doty.

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    3. LOL at Dan Smith, has wine in a box killed that old lunatic yet ?

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  5. I thinmk you misunderstand what Reid said a year ago. He was saying the reports produced by the Pentagon study are not classified. he was challening journalists to go after them, find them, and release rthem. he wanted them to ber made public, and he is saying the same thing now. it's not backpedaling. It is the same stance. He sponsored the study because he wants to know what's going on and thinks the public should know as well. Not all that confusing unless one wants to make it so.

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